Home » Germany and the French Revolution by George Peabody Gooch
Germany and the French Revolution George Peabody Gooch

Germany and the French Revolution

George Peabody Gooch

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230411477
Paperback
230 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 edition. Excerpt: ...must proceed from theMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 edition. Excerpt: ...must proceed from the will of the Sovereign- but the pen must enable the ruler and the people alike to perceive what is unjust. What a people cannot ordain for itself--for instance, a new creed--the Sovereign also cannot impose. Kant shared the feelings of horror with which his countrymen heard of the death of the King, which he was to denounce in his Philosophy of Law as a crime beyond forgiveness. But he refused to despair of the future or to lose faith in the ideas of 1789, and he sometimes astonished his friends by his unconsidered utterances. He is still a thorough democrat, wrote the pious Nicolovius in 1794.2 He said all the horrors in France were unimportant compared with the chronic evil of despotism from which France had suffered, and the Jacobins were probably right in all they were doing. His medical colleague, Metzger, describes the boldness and fearlessness with which for years--if to the end, I know not--he championed the principles of the French Revolution against all comers, even against men of the highest 1 Kant, Briefwechsel, ii. 440, 471-2. Quoted by Hettner, Gesch. der deutschen Lit., iv. 39, position in the State. There was a time in Konigsberg when everybody who had a word to say for the Revolution was entered on the black books of the authorities as a Jacobin. Kant, however, did not let himself be frightened, and he was so respected that he was left in peace.1 A little further information is supplied by Jachmann.2 In no direction, perhaps, did he make so many friends and enemies as by his political ideas. You knew that he pronounced every revolution to be wrong, even under the oppression of cruel despots, and wished reform to take place by the slower but safer road of moral advance. Our task is to strive..